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ONCE UPON A TIME IN 1972.


This fashion collection started with a flow, movement, lava lamp like sway.

(Just press play on the You Tube link to your right and you’ll know what I mean).


Due to all the distress our world is in right now I felt the need (I still do) to emphasize the “good”. Not to sugar coat it, but to change focus, because what we focus on grows, gets energy, momentum and before you know it, it materializes.


So I consider this collection a revolution. Titled SUMMER OF 1972. A revolution of peace&love. Yes, we’ve already had that. But I think we need to have one more go at it!


Collection is filled with flowers, rainbow fringe, kaleidoscope of hearts and rabbits, Native American finger weaving, denim and free rebellious spirit.


I created an interesting, modern fashion hybrid between 21st century tech and the counterculture of the 60s and 70s.

A dynamic subculture that celebrated experimentation and embraced creativity.


I played with a precise 21st century laser beam tech, cutting out symbols of a cultural peace&love phenomenon.

One of the most important factors in this collection is a laser cut symmetrical kaleidoscope pattern full of flowers, rabbits, hearts and the most important word, LOVE.



Peace&Love kaleidoscope light coat.

Long, milkshake white coat sleeves and this fringe playful waistcoat were made with a 21st century laser cut technology.

Cut-out kaleidoscope symmetrical pattern full of flowers, rabbits, hearts and the most important word, LOVE.

The term “mod” comes from modernist, a term used in the 1950s to describe young people who listened modern jazz. It eventually evolved into fashion and a cult of the super cool in the 1960’s and 70’s.

Short mini dress is one of the most iconic mod pieces.


White sweater with rainbow fringe.
Black sweater with rainbow fringe.

In 1969 planting flowers on empty lots in Berkley were considered as acts of civil disobedience.

Dressing in clothing with embroidered flowers, wearing flowers in their hair and distributing flowers to policemen, press, politicians and spectators helped in reducing fear, anger and threat that was inherent within anti-war protests.

Allen Ginsberg’s slogan “flower power” became an integral symbol in the counterculture movement.

In the 60s and 70s hippies were seeking alternative ways of living. They were rejecting suburbia and white middle-class values. Perception of what Indian values were—living simply, off the land and of deep spirituality fascinated them.

Fingerweaving is a Native American art form and plays an important part in this collection.

Native American finger weave coat.

Photography Mihaela O. Mjerhold Photography.

MUA Anita Ferčak

Model Lara Vouk